AN ACCOUNT OF TRAVELS INTO THE INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN AFRICA, IN THE YEARS 1797 AND 1798: INCLUDING CURSORY OBSERVATIONS ON THE GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY OF THE SOUTHERN PART OF THAT CONTINENT...; ...THE NATURAL HISTORY OF SUCH OBJECTS AS OCCURRED IN THE ANIMAL, VEGETABLE, AND MINERAL KINGDOMS; AND SKETCHES ON THE PHYSICAL AND MORAL CHARACTERS OF THE VARIOUS TRIBES OF INHABITANTS SURROUNDING THE SETTLEMENT OF THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE TO WHICH IS ANNEXED, A DESCRIPTION OF THE PRESENT STATE, POPULATION AND PRODUCE OF THAT EXTENSIVE COLONY; WITH A MAP, CONSTRUCTED ENTIRELY FROM ACTUAL OBSERVATIONS, MADE IN THE COURSE OF THE TRAVELS.

New York: G.F. Hopkins (at Washington's Head, No. 118 Pearl-Street), 1802. First American Edition. Leather-bound. From the London Quarto Edition. Calf, Ex-Library, spine repaired with library tape, original spine label, now split and flap-held , laid atop. Front board nearly detached. Bookplate of Salem Public Library, given by Essex Institute July 15, 1892. Inked accession number on dedication page, which itself is partially detached. Remainder of pages sollid. Rear hinge repaired/solid. Minor rippling and VERY light foxing throughout. One line drawing of an antelope. [iv] 386 [1](ad). Fold-out frontis map.

Note: Books with detached boards CAN be professionally re-attached. Ask us to recommend a skilled conservator. Good. Item #76780

"...The females being considered as the property of their parents, are always disposed of by sale. The common price of a wife is an ox or a couple of cows...When an offer is made for the purchase . of a daughter, she feels little inclination to refuse; she considers herself as an article at market, and is neither surprised, nor unhappy, nor interested, on being told that she . is about to be disposed of...(p. 195)

"Quick as the Hottentots are in observing the bees, as they fly to their nests, they have still amuch better guide . on which they invariably rely This is a small brownish bird...of the cuckoo genus, to which naturalists have given the specific name of Indicator, from the circumstance of its pointing out and discovering, by a chirping and whistling noise, the nests of bees...Having observed a nest of honey, it . immediately flies . in search of some human creature, to whom, by its fluttering, and whistling, and chirping, it communicates the discovery. Everyone here is too well acquainted with the bird to have any doubts as to the certainty of this information. It leads the way directly towards the place..When close to the nest, it remains still and silent. As soon as theperson, to whom the discovery was made, shall have taken away the honey, the Indicator flies to feast on the remains. By the like . conduct . it is also said to indicate, with equal certainty, the dens of lions, tigers, hyaenas, and other beasts of prey and noxious animals..." (pp. 302-303).

Price: $250.00 save 5% $237.50

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