BOSCOBEL: OR THE HISTORY OF HIS SACRED MAJESTIES MOST MIRACULOUS PRESERVATION AFTER THE BATTLE OF WORCESTER, 3. SEPT. 1651. INTRODUCED BY AN EXACT RELATION OF THAT BATTLE; Boscobel: or The History of His Sacred Majesties Most Miraculous Preservation after the Battle of Worcester, 3. Sept. 1651. Introduced by an exact Relation of that Battle. Thomas Blount.
BOSCOBEL: OR THE HISTORY OF HIS SACRED MAJESTIES MOST MIRACULOUS PRESERVATION AFTER THE BATTLE OF WORCESTER, 3. SEPT. 1651. INTRODUCED BY AN EXACT RELATION OF THAT BATTLE; Boscobel: or The History of His Sacred Majesties Most Miraculous Preservation after the Battle of Worcester, 3. Sept. 1651. Introduced by an exact Relation of that Battle.
BOSCOBEL: OR THE HISTORY OF HIS SACRED MAJESTIES MOST MIRACULOUS PRESERVATION AFTER THE BATTLE OF WORCESTER, 3. SEPT. 1651. INTRODUCED BY AN EXACT RELATION OF THAT BATTLE; Boscobel: or The History of His Sacred Majesties Most Miraculous Preservation after the Battle of Worcester, 3. Sept. 1651. Introduced by an exact Relation of that Battle.
BOSCOBEL: OR THE HISTORY OF HIS SACRED MAJESTIES MOST MIRACULOUS PRESERVATION AFTER THE BATTLE OF WORCESTER, 3. SEPT. 1651. INTRODUCED BY AN EXACT RELATION OF THAT BATTLE; Boscobel: or The History of His Sacred Majesties Most Miraculous Preservation after the Battle of Worcester, 3. Sept. 1651. Introduced by an exact Relation of that Battle.
BOSCOBEL: OR THE HISTORY OF HIS SACRED MAJESTIES MOST MIRACULOUS PRESERVATION AFTER THE BATTLE OF WORCESTER, 3. SEPT. 1651. INTRODUCED BY AN EXACT RELATION OF THAT BATTLE; Boscobel: or The History of His Sacred Majesties Most Miraculous Preservation after the Battle of Worcester, 3. Sept. 1651. Introduced by an exact Relation of that Battle.

BOSCOBEL: OR THE HISTORY OF HIS SACRED MAJESTIES MOST MIRACULOUS PRESERVATION AFTER THE BATTLE OF WORCESTER, 3. SEPT. 1651. INTRODUCED BY AN EXACT RELATION OF THAT BATTLE; Boscobel: or The History of His Sacred Majesties Most Miraculous Preservation after the Battle of Worcester, 3. Sept. 1651. Introduced by an exact Relation of that Battle.

London. for Henry Seile, 1660. First Edition. Leather-bound. Small 8vo, pp 55 Old full sheep.The title, which lacks the second word "Compleat" and only reads "...The History of his Sacred Majesties Most MIraculous Preservation...(etc.), much scarcer First edition, which may not have had the picture of Boscobel which showed up in the second issue of this tale of Charles's harrowing escape. Folding portrait of Charles II as frontispiece and armorial plate. Title page in red and black. Dedication signed "Blount" vi + 58 pp. (pp. 9 and 10 appear twice -- i.e., numbering goes 8, 9. 10, 9, 10, 11. Second plate between pp. 52 and 53, an armorial engraving by Robert Vaughn with three crowns and an Oak tree with a banner strip below, in Latin, which reads: "Subditus Fidelis Regis & Regni Salus" (A subject faithful to his King, saved the Kingdom) which honoring the fortitude and dedication of "Carlis" who directly aided the King's safe passage out of the country. Back strip severely chipped, lacking front pastedown, joints split, stitching slack, a number of leaves detached, portrait torn and repaired, generally dusty. Contemporary inscriptions to endpapers. Text clean. ESTC R1530. Binding poor; text block very good. Item #80415

"After the final Royalist defeat of the English Civil War against Cromwell's New Model Army at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651, Charles the son of Charles I (who was at that time King of Scotland and who was later to become Charles II of England) was forced to flee, famously avoiding detection by hiding in an oak tree in a wood that was being searched by Parliamentarian soldiers, [a feat suggested and hugely assisted by Colonel William Carless (Carlis) who supported the King in the tree, and allowed the exhausted regent to sleep.] A £1,000 reward was announced for information leading to Charles's capture. Relying on the support of a network of Royalist gentry, Charles first attempted to escape into Wales, then to Bristol disguised as a servant, then to the south coast at Charmouth disguised as an eloping lover. Finally, he rode east to Shoreham from where he took a coal boat to France on 15 October 1651..."

These event described within this mid-seventeenth century book are more like "The Great Escape" -- the stuff of great cinema thrillers. The humbling disguises which the King had to adopt just to escape the country as a formidable network dedicated to his capture closed in around him, are, in a time well before movies, of course, great literature as well. (For more information, from your favorite search site, look up "The Escape of Charles II", or purchase the book and read!).

Price: $550.00 save 5% $522.50

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