ADVANCE AND RETREAT: PERSONAL EXPERIENCES IN THE UNITED STATES AND CONFEDERATE STATES ARMIES; Advance and Retreat. Memoirs of General John Bell Hood. J. B. Hood, Lieutenant-General in the Confederate Army.
ADVANCE AND RETREAT: PERSONAL EXPERIENCES IN THE UNITED STATES AND CONFEDERATE STATES ARMIES; Advance and Retreat. Memoirs of General John Bell Hood.
ADVANCE AND RETREAT: PERSONAL EXPERIENCES IN THE UNITED STATES AND CONFEDERATE STATES ARMIES; Advance and Retreat. Memoirs of General John Bell Hood.
ADVANCE AND RETREAT: PERSONAL EXPERIENCES IN THE UNITED STATES AND CONFEDERATE STATES ARMIES; Advance and Retreat. Memoirs of General John Bell Hood.
ADVANCE AND RETREAT: PERSONAL EXPERIENCES IN THE UNITED STATES AND CONFEDERATE STATES ARMIES; Advance and Retreat. Memoirs of General John Bell Hood.
ADVANCE AND RETREAT: PERSONAL EXPERIENCES IN THE UNITED STATES AND CONFEDERATE STATES ARMIES; Advance and Retreat. Memoirs of General John Bell Hood.

ADVANCE AND RETREAT: PERSONAL EXPERIENCES IN THE UNITED STATES AND CONFEDERATE STATES ARMIES; Advance and Retreat. Memoirs of General John Bell Hood.

New Orleans, Louisiana: Published for the Hood Orphan Memorial Fund by G.T.Beauregard. 1880. First Edition. Leather-bound. 1st edition, published for the Hood Orphan Memorial Fund.Full handsome sheep,with two contrasting black leather title labels, lettered in gilt. Marbled endpapers, and as well, all edges. Front hinge started. Very clean copy internally. 9 in. 358pp. Includes: Frontis portrait, wartime communiques, battle maps, foldout map and Hood's correspondence., Maps & Illustrations. Very clean and tight. Very Good. Item #81834

"The controversial, sometimes bitter, memoirs of a maimed Confederate general..."(Civil War Books: A Critical Bibliography, by Nevins, Robertson and Wiley, Vol. II, p. 65)

In "The South to Posterity: An Introduction to the Writing of Confederate History" Douglas Southall Freeman wrote:...This is a genuinely tragic book, brave and bitter, wistful and manly, touched with humor in the early chapters, grim in its recountal of the circumstances which defeated his final plan of operations, that had, at least in theory, the possibility of shining success. The story of Atlanta, of Jonesboro, of Nashville, and of Franklin is the darker because, where responsibility had been less, Hood had been one of the South's finest figures.Magnificent in stature ere he was maimed, no brigade commander had better troops in the summer of 1862 and no chief of division in 1863 had larger renown. In sociey he was as distinguished as on the field of battle, and in the conquest of the Confederate capital, he had been as swift as in attack at Second Manassas. He did not live to enjoy the modest success his book attained..."(pp. 79-80). [And "In Tall Cotton: The 200 Most Important Confederate Books for the Reader, Researcher and Collector"

Price: $450.00 save 5% $427.50