POEMS ON AFFAIRS OF STATE: THREE VOLUMES: I): FROM THE TIME OF OLIVER CROMWELL TO THE ABDICATION OF K. JAMES THE SECOND; II): FROM THE REIN OF K. JAMES THE FIRST, TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1703; III): FROM 1640 TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1704. WRITTEN BY THE GREATEST WITS OF THE AGE....PUBLISHED WITHOUT ANY CASTRATION. Anonymous.
POEMS ON AFFAIRS OF STATE: THREE VOLUMES: I): FROM THE TIME OF OLIVER CROMWELL TO THE ABDICATION OF K. JAMES THE SECOND; II): FROM THE REIN OF K. JAMES THE FIRST, TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1703; III): FROM 1640 TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1704. WRITTEN BY THE GREATEST WITS OF THE AGE....PUBLISHED WITHOUT ANY CASTRATION.
POEMS ON AFFAIRS OF STATE: THREE VOLUMES: I): FROM THE TIME OF OLIVER CROMWELL TO THE ABDICATION OF K. JAMES THE SECOND; II): FROM THE REIN OF K. JAMES THE FIRST, TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1703; III): FROM 1640 TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1704. WRITTEN BY THE GREATEST WITS OF THE AGE....PUBLISHED WITHOUT ANY CASTRATION.
POEMS ON AFFAIRS OF STATE: THREE VOLUMES: I): FROM THE TIME OF OLIVER CROMWELL TO THE ABDICATION OF K. JAMES THE SECOND; II): FROM THE REIN OF K. JAMES THE FIRST, TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1703; III): FROM 1640 TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1704. WRITTEN BY THE GREATEST WITS OF THE AGE....PUBLISHED WITHOUT ANY CASTRATION.
POEMS ON AFFAIRS OF STATE: THREE VOLUMES: I): FROM THE TIME OF OLIVER CROMWELL TO THE ABDICATION OF K. JAMES THE SECOND; II): FROM THE REIN OF K. JAMES THE FIRST, TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1703; III): FROM 1640 TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1704. WRITTEN BY THE GREATEST WITS OF THE AGE....PUBLISHED WITHOUT ANY CASTRATION.

POEMS ON AFFAIRS OF STATE: THREE VOLUMES: I): FROM THE TIME OF OLIVER CROMWELL TO THE ABDICATION OF K. JAMES THE SECOND; II): FROM THE REIN OF K. JAMES THE FIRST, TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1703; III): FROM 1640 TO THIS PRESENT YEAR 1704. WRITTEN BY THE GREATEST WITS OF THE AGE....PUBLISHED WITHOUT ANY CASTRATION.

London, England: 1703-04. Leather-bound. Full Cambridge paneled leather, of mottled calf . All front and rear boards with large circular (2 1/2" diameter) gilt arms of Lewis Watson, 2nd Earl of Rockingham (1714-45) Gilt decorated spine with four raised bands (five compartments) and contrasting, red leather title labels. Wear and some shelf-rubbing to spine caps, with a one-inch loss of leather across bottom of spine to Volume III. Inside, armorial bookplates matching the gilt cover designs, to front pastedowns. Moderate toning and intermittent light spotting throughout, but eminently readable without distraction. Some of the poets include: The Duke of Buckingham, Earl of Rochester, Lord Bu____st, Sir John Denam, Andrew Marvell, Esq; Mr. Milton; Mr. Dryden; Mr. Sprat; Mr. Wallter; Mr. Ayloff, & c. With some Miscellany Poems by the same: Most whereof never before Printed. Now carefullly examined with the Originals, and Published without any Castration". Volume I is "The Fifth Edition, Corrected and Much Enlarged"; Volumes II and III are the first editions. "Poems on Affairs of State brings together some of the best known and most outrageous satires of the latter half of the 17th and early 18th centuries. What are the poems about? Poems on Affairs of State is concerned with all manner of subjects, including war, religion and party politics, as well as royal mistresses and literary rivalries. Personal attacks were common, and it was as much a prominent man or woman’s politics as their personal life that came under fire from satirists. Who wrote verse-satires? Verse-satires can be attributed to almost all of the major literary figures of the Restoration and early 18th century. However, satires were usually printed or circulated in manuscript form without any authorial attribution because of the severe legal penalties attached to creating or sharing seditious material. In 1681 Stephen College – a populist writer of satirical verses and ballads condemning King Charles II – was executed for treason on the grounds of his poetry..." (British Library). Good Plus. Item #83920

These Poems on Affairs of State, as they came to be known, provide an inexhaustible and minute record of the times from every point of view...In this more literate age, poetical wit could skewer an opponent far more effectively than prose.

Here's an excerpt of one who has his strong opinions about the phonies he encounters in London town. (apologies, no line breaks):

"...With equal scorn I always did abhor The effeminate Fops, and bustling Men of War, The carful Face of Ministers of State, I always judg'd to be a downright Cheat. The smiling Courtier, and the Counsellor grave, I always thought two different Marks of Knave. They that talk loud, and they that draw i't' Pit, These want of courage shew, those want of Wit. Thus all the World endeavours to appear, What they'd be thought to be, not what they are. If any then by most unhappy Choice,Seek for Content in London's Crowd and Noise, Must form his Words and Manners to the place: If he'll see Ladies, must like Villers dress, In a soft Tone without one word of Sense, Must talk of Dancing and the Court of France; must praise alike the Ugly and the Fair... "A Satyr in Answer to a Friend", (1682).

Price: $225.00 save 10% $202.50

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