MEMORIAL EDITION: THE DRAWINGS OF CLARE BRIGGS (7 VOLS.). Clare Briggs.
MEMORIAL EDITION: THE DRAWINGS OF CLARE BRIGGS (7 VOLS.)
MEMORIAL EDITION: THE DRAWINGS OF CLARE BRIGGS (7 VOLS.)
MEMORIAL EDITION: THE DRAWINGS OF CLARE BRIGGS (7 VOLS.)
MEMORIAL EDITION: THE DRAWINGS OF CLARE BRIGGS (7 VOLS.)
MEMORIAL EDITION: THE DRAWINGS OF CLARE BRIGGS (7 VOLS.)
MEMORIAL EDITION: THE DRAWINGS OF CLARE BRIGGS (7 VOLS.)
MEMORIAL EDITION: THE DRAWINGS OF CLARE BRIGGS (7 VOLS.)

MEMORIAL EDITION: THE DRAWINGS OF CLARE BRIGGS (7 VOLS.)

New York: Wm. H. Wise & Co., 1930. Softcover. Small folios, measuring 8 3/4" x 7 1/2". Flexible, black pebbled covers, most volumes separating felt-lined covers from text block due to gluing that has outlived its ability to hold the cheaply constructed books together. Each roughly about 100 unnumbered pages. Text blocks in very good condition.

Issues usually have two or three of the following strips: "That Guiltiest Feeling; Oh Man; Old Songs;The Days of Real Sport; It Happens in the Best of Regulated Families; Real Folks at Home; Wonder What -- Thinks about; Movie of a Man; Handy Man Around the House; Kelly Pool; Tedious Pastimes; Golf; How to Start the Day Wrong; Ain't it a Grand and Glorious Feelin'?; Somebody's Always Taking the Joy out of Life; There's at Least One in Every Office; When a Feller Needs a Friend" Good. Item #84856

Briggs worked in Chicago as a cartoonist for the Hearst dailies, the Chicago American and Chicago Examiner...and soon thereafter was hired in 1907 by the Chicago Tribune...and used commonplace topics such as tracking mud, setting off fireworks, being seen with a girl, and having to dress up to recall the 'good old days.' Briggs [also] developed several other popular series: “When a Feller Needs a Friend”; “Ain’t it a Grand and Glorious Feelin’ ”; “Somebody’s Always Taking the Joy out of Life”; and “How to Start the Day Wrong,” ..delighting his readers with stories about the highs and lows of childhood. His strips were well drawn and both adults and children enjoyed their gentle humor. In 1914 Briggs was signed by the New York Tribune Syndicate and remained with it until his death, working at the flagship paper, the New York Herald-Tribune. ...Without discarding his original topics, he developed strips that depicted the problems and triumphs of the urban lower-middle class male and female at home and at work. and then went on to develop a different and distinctive style ...His drawings of small town and city life are so accurate that they provide a historical record of their era [and he] also displayed a social conscience that was rare in the comic pages at this time. Some of his “city kids’ ” cartoons point out the callous unconcern of the wealthy toward the needy. ...Briggs drew attention to the importance of ordinary people, including street cleaners, cabdrivers, traffic cops, and hod carriers by basing a strip on their homelife. [and] he celebrated ...the commonplace events of life. His drawings were published as a series of compilations of his newspaper work and were very popular because they dealt with the idiosyncrasies and weaknesses of humanity. His panels also provide an excellent source of information about everyday life during his generation..." (ANB).

Price: $95.00

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