PROGRESSIVE MEN OF THE STATE OF MONTANA. A W. Bowen, Co.
PROGRESSIVE MEN OF THE STATE OF MONTANA
PROGRESSIVE MEN OF THE STATE OF MONTANA
PROGRESSIVE MEN OF THE STATE OF MONTANA
PROGRESSIVE MEN OF THE STATE OF MONTANA
PROGRESSIVE MEN OF THE STATE OF MONTANA
PROGRESSIVE MEN OF THE STATE OF MONTANA
PROGRESSIVE MEN OF THE STATE OF MONTANA

PROGRESSIVE MEN OF THE STATE OF MONTANA

Chicago, IL: A. W. BOWEN & CO., circa 1902. Leather-bound. Massive quarto, full brown stamped morocco with bright gilt lettering to spine.11 1/4 in. x 9 1/4 in. x 4 1/2 in. 1886 pp. Lovely floriated light-upon-dark green endpapers, with two little scratches. Previous owner's name and date (Nov. 16, 1902) to front free endpaper. J.A. Green was the name of that owner, and his particular biography is to be found on pp. 189-190. Random stain on a very few pages, and some small markings to edges. Light ripping to a sizeable chunk of pages -- probably around 500, from past water contact, but NO evidence of any damage. VERY HEAVY. If your folks folks folks came from Montana and made their mark, this is the book they'd probably were asked to buy. Additional shipping charges may apply. Very Good Plus. Item #85182

Biographies of farmers, bankers, storekeepers, citizens, along with photographs. "Joseph A. Green of Bozeman, Gallatin county has practically passed his entire life in Montana, has been closely identified with its farming, stockgrowing and mercantile pursuits and shown himself to be a man of progressive type...The father was engaged in farming in Utah, and in 1864, when our subject was but four years of age, started with his family to Montana by means of ox teams...He located on a ranch near the present village of Willow Creek...in making the trip across the plains the party encountered no trouble from the Indians, save in the way of horse stealing..."

Another biography of one Isaac Roe (p. 1192) reads: "...After waiting eight day7s for the ice to break up Mr. Roe crossed the river and proceeded to his destination at Grinnell, Iowa. There he began outfitting for his reutrn trip to Bannack, and not considering his outfit coplete on this occasion without a wife, he was mar5ried to Miss Martha Freeman, of Grinnell, and, after completing his arrangements, they started on the long and hazardous journey with wagon loads of merchanidise drawn by oxen. Nothing of note occurred until they were well up the Platte river, where Mr. Roe was arrested as a southern sympathizer, the arrest resulting from a casual remark. Indians had attacked two government wagons, killing the sergeant and running off the mules. That night a stranger came into the camp and, addressing our subject, who was captain of the train, deplored the death of the sergeant, but more particularly the loss of the mules. Our subject replied that the death of the sergent was very sad, but he did feel particularly on account of the mules. For this remark he was arrested and taken back fifty miles, without knowing the causer, and made to carry a sack of sand from one give point to another, back and forth, for two days, and was released only by the fortunate arrival of a former acquaintance who vouched for his loyalty. He was then turned loose without provisions, alone, on foot, in a country full of hostile Indians and 100 miles behind his wagons...". He caught up.

"...He started again in April 1865, again being elected captain of the train, and taking every precaution to protect his company from attacks by the Indians, who were very bad that summer. On one occasion, after the Indians left a train in front of him which they had attacked, his train drove to the place and found the dead bodies of two men and one young lady., the savages having broken every joint of the young lady's body, even those of her fingers and toes..."

Price: $750.00

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